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Johann Adam “Spartacus” Weishaupt
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Founder of the Bavarian Illuminati.
Founder of the Bavarian Illuminati.
Born 1748-02-06
Died 1830-11-18
Father Johann Georg Weishaupt
Jesuit taught founder of the Illuminati.
timeline
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Weishaupt met with a Jewish mystic known as Kolmer who had spent years in Egypt. Kolmer was an practitioner of black magic of the Mystery School of Kabbalah, and member of the Alumbrado movement.

It is believed by researcher Jüri Lina that Kolmer so impressed Weishaupt with his knowledge of the Egyptan mysteries that this was the reason Weishaupt chose the pyramid with the all-seeing-eye as the symbol for the Illuminati.

Conspiracy researcher Nesta Webster thought that Kolmer was another name for a mystic known in Italy as Altotas.
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Member of Freemasonry 1777 1830-11-18
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Masonic Lodge “Theodor zum guten Rath” in Munich, Bavaria.
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Two years after the inception of the Illuminati Weishaupt wrote two other members code named Marius and Cato (Jacob Anton von Hertel, and Franz Xavier Zwack respectively) with a request to change the name of their secret society to the “Order of the Bees”. This change would have included the changing of all other secret keywords in the order to a bee theme (from the current roman style code words). The idea was soon after scraped.
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A warrant for the arrest of Adam Weishaupt went out and he was forced into hiding. He was assisted in escaping from Ingolstadt by fellow Illuminati member Joseph Martin who helped him get to Nuremberg dressed as a laborer.
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Lanz while traveling to Silesia stops in Regensburg to meet with Illuminati founder Adam Weishaupt. Weishaupt had met up with Lanz near the city gates, where Lanz is struck by a bolt of lightning.

Lanz is taken to a near by chapel by concerned citizens but he is already dead. Bavarian authorities search the body and find secret documents that according to Illuminati researcher Terry Melanson contained:

"(1) the names of Lodges and villages or towns in which they are located;
(2) the name of the Master of the Chair, the two wardens directly below him, and any other influential members of the Lodge;
(3) what system does it practice;
(4) how long has the Lodge been active;
(5) the manner in which it is directed or operated;
(6) how many degrees it confers above that of the three symbolic grades;
(7) if they are aware of the Order of the Illuminati;
(8) what opinion they have formed of it;
(9) what are their thoughts concerning the persecutions of the Freemasons and Illuminati in Bavaria, and who they think is responsible;
(10) what they say about the Disciples of Loyola and the Jesuits. He was also instructed not to reveal his status as an Illuminatus, with hope of provoking genuine responses."

Another interesting point Melanson makes is that Lanz was a supposed priest of God, and this looks like a clear cut case of divine retribution against Lanz, and the order of the Illuminati.

*Note some Freemasons deny this historical event such as the article "A Bavarian Illuminati primer" by Trevor W. McKeown, but other oculists such as Mark Booth state it as fact in his new age book "The Secret History of the World". It is important to keep in mind that these secret societies have sworn upon death to protect the secrets of the order and even lying about events is an acceptable practice to them.
Quotes
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The great strength of our Order lies in its concealment; let it never appear in any place in its own name, but always covered by another name, and another occupation. None is fitter than the three lower degrees of Free Masonry; the public is accustomed to it, expects little from it, and therefore takes little notice of it. Next to this, the form of a learned or literary society is best sited to our purpose, and had Free masonry not existed, this cover would have been employed; and it may be much more than a cover, it may be a powerful engine in our hands. By establishing reading societies, and subscription libraries, and taking these under our direction, and supplying them through our labours, we may turn the public mind which way we will.